FlashCards for Students

Pharmacology Chapter 12- Drugs for Degenerative Diseases and Muscles

Can medications cure Neurologic Degenerative Diseases? noWhat is Parkinsons? the death of neurons that produce dopamineWhat are some symptoms of Parkinsons? -tremors – muscle rigidity – masked face – postural immobilityWhat are the goals of medicine to treat Parkinsons? – increase ability of the person to live as normal as possibleWhat is the most common type of drug to treat Parkinsons? a dopaminergic drugWhy can we not give dopamine to people with Parkinsons? because dopamine cannot cross the blood brain barrierWhat is the prototype drug for dopaminergic drugs for Parkinsons? levodopa-carbidopa – used ...

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Pharmacology Endocrine Drugs

Steroid Hormones are derived from CholesterolFollicle begins to develop in response to: Rising FSH levels During this time follicle secretes estrogenElevated estrogen levels stimulate: The release of LH from pituitary gland this triggers ovulationProgesterone supresses: LH levels which prevents ovulationMenstruation gingivtis can occur right before the start of one’s period and will clear up shortly after the periodWhat role does progesterone play in gingivitis? Dilates blood vessels causing inflammation, blocks repair of collagen, the structural protein that supports the gumsClinical uses of Estrogen Therapy: To treat hormona...

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Sinclair pharmacology Exam 1 Drugs

MOA: Inhibiting prostaglandin production Drugs: Salicylates- Asprin, Diflunisal COX2 inhibitors- celecoxib Enolic Acid Derivatives- Proxicam, meloxicam, nabumetone Propionic Acids- fenoprofen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, oxaprozin Acetic Acids- indomethicin, ketorolac,diclofenac sodium, sulindac, tolmetin, etodolac Class: NSAIDsMOA: Agonist, Agonist-Antaginist, Antagonist- Bind to opiod pain receptors Drugs: Codine sulfate, meperidine HCl, methadone HCl, morphine sulfate, propoxyphene HCl, Hydromorphone, oxycodone, fetanyl Class: Opioid AnalgesicsMOA: Blocks pain impulses peripherally by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis Drug: Acetaminop...

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Ch. 16 Psychotherapeutic Drugs

Psychotherapeutic Drugs Used in the treatment of emotional and mental disorders. Ability to cope with emotions can range from occasional depression or anxiety to constant emotional distress. When emotions significantly affect an individual’s ability to carry out normal daily functions, treatment with a psychotherapeutic drug is a possible option.Psychotherapeutic Drugs Three main emotional and mental disorders: Anxiety Affective disorders-mood disorders Psychoses-schitzophreniaPsychotherapeutic Drugs Types of psychotherapeutic drugs Anxiolytic drugs-anxious/anxiety Mood-stabilizing drugs-bipolar Antidepressant drugs Antipsychotic drugs-for most se...

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Ch 58 – Otic Drugs

Type of Ear Disorders Bacterial and fungal infections; Inflammatory disorders that cause pain; Earwax accumulationOtitis externa: outer ear infection (external ear, ear canal, AKA “swimmer’s ear”) Most common in adults; May be result of physical trauma, dermatitis; If untreated, tinnitus, nausea, vertigo, mastoiditis may occur; Symptoms include pain-esp. with manipulation of tragusOtitis media: middle ear infection Most common in children and follows an upper respiratory tract infection; In adults, usually results from foreign objects or water sports; Symptoms include pain, fever, malaise, pressure, sensation of fullness in the ears, heari...

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Pharmacology Drugs Flashcards

Nexium Generic Name: esomeprazol Classification: proton pump inhibitor Uses: treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions involving excessive stomach acid. Side Effects: dizziness, confusion;fast or uneven heart rate;jerking muscle movements; ADULT DOSE:20 mg or 40 mg esomeprazole given once daily by intravenous injectionLipitor Generic Name: ATORVASTATIN Classification: HMG-COA REDUCTASE INHIBITOR Uses:reduces levels of “bad” cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of “good” cholesterol Side Effects:unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness; confusion, memory problems;fever, unusual tiredness, and d...

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Forensic Toxicology: Fentanyls & Designer Drugs

Origin of Term “Designer Drug” -From popular science press -R. Baum “Designer Drugs: Underground Chemists Ply a Deadly Trade” —Sept 1985 -W. Gallagher, “Beyond Crack: The Growing Peril of Designer Drugs” —Aug 1986Definition of Designer Drugs -Synthesized from common chemicals -Exempt from DEA control due to unique chemical structure -Skillfully marketed under attractive or exotic names -WHO publication 1990 -Chemicals and pharmacological profiles of fentanyls and aminorex -Does not define the term “Designer Drugs” -A drug produced by a minor modification in chemical structure of an existing drug resulting in a new substance with si...

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Pharmacology Cardiac Drugs

What is Atherosclerosis? It a disease characterized by deposits if fatty plaques on the inner was of arties.What does the fatty plaques on the inner was do? The deposits result in a narrowing of the lumen (inner diameter) of the artery and a decrease in blood supply to the area served by the artery.What does vasodilating drugs do? Vasodilating drugs relax the smooth muscle layer of the arterial blood vessels which result in vasodiltion.What is Vasodilation? Vasodilation is an increase in the size of blood vessels, primarily small arteries and arterioles.What is Angina? Angina is a disorder characterized by Atherosclerotic plaque formation in the...

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Drug Final

Which of the following was the principal reason for the “opium wars” between China and Great Britain? The British attacked the Chinese because of Chinese opposition to the British opium trade in China.Which of the following perfected the hypodermic syringe? Alexander WoodIn 1914, the regulation of opium began with the __________. Harrison Narcotic ActWhich of the following was the first use of heroin in the United States? Cough suppressantWhich of the following is the most common clinical use of narcotics today? Pain reliefWhich of the following is not a clinical use of narcotics? Reduction of congestionSelect the incorre...

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Lorazepam (Ativan) Intro to Pharmacology Drug Quiz #8

Lorazepam (Ativan) Mechanism of Action 1/2 Binds to the benzodiazepan receptor and enhances the effects of the brain chemical GABA, an inhibitory transmitterLorazepam (Ativan) Mechanism of Action 2/2 And may result in a state of sedation, hypnosis, skeletal muscle relaxation, anticonvulsant activity, comaLorazepam (Ativan) Indications 1/3 Preprocedure sedation inductionLorazepam (Ativan) Indications 2/3 AnxietyLorazepam (Ativan) Indications 3/3 Status epilepticusLorazepam (Ativan) Contraindications 1/5 Shock, ComaLorazepam (Ativan) Contraindications 2/5 Acute closed-angle glaucomaLorazepam (Ativan) Contraindications 3/5 COPD...

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