FlashCards for Students

Class F (freestanding emergency medical care facility) Pharmacy rules

What is a Class F pharmacy? a freestanding facility that is licensed by the texas Department of State Health Services to provide emergency care to patients.Which organization gives license to a Class F? Texas Department of State health services.How many PICs should be there for a Class F? 1 PIC who is atleast part time or on a consultant basis.In the absence of the RPh, who is allowed to access the pharmacy? designated agents such as licensed nurse or practitioner.How should a Class F pharmacy maintain its CS drugs? must have a perpetual inventoryp{text-indent: 1.5em;}...

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FlashCards for Students

Emergency Planning And Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA)

4 Provisions of EPCRA 1. Emergency Planning 2. Emergency Release Notification 3. Community Right-to-Know Requirements 4. Toxic Release InventoryEPCRA was enacted on what date? November 1986Federal Register 40 Parts 300 350 355 370 372 – National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan – Trade Secrecy Claims for Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Information: and Trade Secret Disclosure to Health Professionals – Emergency Planning and Notification – Hazardous Chemical Reporting: Community Rights-to-Know – Toxic Chemical Release Reporting: Community Right-to-knowMaterials Covered by EPCRA 1....

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FlashCards for Students

Rapid Review Pharmacology

Absence seizures EthosuximideAcute gout attack NSAIDs, colchicine, glucocorticoidsAcute promyelocytic leukemia (M3) All-trans retinoic acidADHD Methylphenidate, CBT, atomoxetineAlcoholism Disulfiram, acamprosate, naltrexone, supportive careAlcohol withdrawal Long-acting benzodiazepinesAnorexia Nutrition, psychotherapy, mirtazapineAnticoagulation during pregnancy HeparinArrhythmia in damaged cardiac tissue Class IB antiarrhythmic (lidocaine, mexiletine)B12 deficiency Vitamin B12 supplementation (work up cause with Schilling test)Benign prostatic hyperplasia α1-antagonists, 5α-reductase inhibitors, PDE-5 inhibit...

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FlashCards for Students

68T First Aid for Heat Stroke

Thermoregulation establishes a set point which may be changed up or down corresponding to hyperthermia or hypothermiaWhat is the center for thermoregulation control? anterior hypothalamushyperthermia increase in core body temperature above the normalWhat are the four major categories of hyperthermia? Pyrogenic Inadequate heat dissipation exercise hyperthermia pathologic and pharmacologicWhat are the four types of heat dissipation? evaporation radiation convection conductionHeat Stress temp < 106, heavy but controlled pantingheat exhaustion Temp 106.1-108, uncontrolled panting, dyspnea,heat cramps Na+ depletion, muscle cramps...

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FlashCards for Students

EMR Chp 1

Enhanced 911 systems allow the caller’s information to be received electronically to the Dispatch centerThe medical director is a physician who assumes the ultimate responsibility for the: Medical oversight of the EMS system, patient outcome, protocolsYou have received orders to administer oxygen to the patient. This would be called: On-line medical directionThe procedures that an Emergency Medical Responder can provide as care for a patient are called Scope of practiceEmergency Medical Responders are trained in the care and management of ill and injured patients. An Emergency Medical Responder should not be involved in the process ofL Tra...

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FlashCards for Students

Pharmacology wk#2 Test#1

What is minimum effective concentration (MEC)? The lowest plasma concentration required to cause measurable response.what is onset of action? Onset of action is when plasma concentration reaches the minimum effective concentration. Length of time before med starts to work.What does peak mean? Peak is the highest plasma concentration. This is when drug will have strongest effect.When is the greatest risk for toxic or adverse reaction? at the peak plasma concentrationWhat is duration of action? Duration of action is the time period when plasma concentration is above MEC.What is therapeutic index? The ratio between the toxic dose and the effe...

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FlashCards for Students

pharm ch 2: Application of Pharmacology in Nursing Practice

Seven aspects of drug therapy 1) pre-administration assessment 2) dosage and administration 3) evaluating and promoting therapeutic effects 4) minimizing adverse effects 5) minimizing adverse interactions 6) making PRN decisions 7) managing toxicityThree goals of ASSESSMENT 1) collecting baseline data 2) identifying high-risk patients 3) assessing the pts capacity for self-care.low doses of Aspirin relieve painhigh doses of Aspirin relieve inflammationMorphine doses Oral = higher doses injected = lower dosesto make an evaluation you must know: -the rationale for treatment -nature and time course of intended responseNifedipine -given ...

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FlashCards for Students

Surgical Recall 69 – Hand Surgery

Bones of the hand? Phalanges Metacarpal bones Carpal bonesWhat is the tip of the finger joint? Distal InterPhalangeal joint (DIP)What is the middle finger joint? Proximal InterPhalangeal joint (PIP)What is the knuckle joint? Metacarpal Phalangeal joint (MP)What are the intrinsic hand muscles? Lumbricals Interosseous musclesWhat is adduction and abduction of the fingers? ADDuction is to the midline ABDuction is away from the midlineWhat are the trauma zones of the hand? Zone 1 – beyond PIP Zone 2 – MP to PIP Zone 3 – Thumb crease to MP Zone 4 – Lower half of the palm Zone 5 – Palmer crease and proximal...

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FlashCards for Students

Surgery – General Abdominal Surgery

What are common premedications and their doses? Acepromazine: 0.02-0.05 mg/kgWhat are common induction agents and their doses? Propofol: 4-6 mg/kg Propofol at 2 mg/kg and diazepam at 0.25 mg/kg Ketamine at 5 mg/kg plus Valium at 0.25 mg/kg or combined Ket/Val at 1 ml/10 ikgWhat are common medications for fractious cats and their doses? Medetomidine at 0.02 mg/kg Butorphanol at 0.2 mg/kg Ketamine at 5 mg/kgWhat is commonly used for maintenance of anesthesia? isoflurane and sevofluraneWhat is the most common antibiotic? cefazolin (1/2 hour prior to start of surgery and every 2 hours intra-op)How long should the incision be for exploratory la...

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FlashCards for Students

using your knowledge 29

in coronary bypass surgery, a section of the vein is used to replace occluded coronary arteries. Over time, the vein wall becomes more like an arterial wall. Describe the change that would occur in the vein wall. the tunica media would become thicker, containing more smooth muscle and elastic fibersthe smooth muscle fibers within the wall of an artery do not receive their nutrients from the blood within the lumen of the artery. why not? arterial wall is too thick for nutrients from blood to diffuse to the smooth muscle fibersblood flow within the capillaries is slower than within arterial or venous vessels. explain why this is important blood flow must be s...

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